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BJOG release: A greater focus on socially disadvantaged women is needed to improve maternity care in England, suggest researchers

News 17 September 2014

Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published today (17 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG).

Differences in health outcomes amongst different socioeconomic groups have been demonstrated in many areas and have provided the focus for national initiatives in the UK to reduce the observed inequalities.

The Oxford University study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, explores outcomes and experiences of maternity care amongst women from different socioeconomic groups in order to improve understanding of why socially disadvantaged women have poorer maternal health outcomes in the UK.

A secondary analysis of the 2010 National Maternity Survey was undertaken in 2012 using a cohort of 5,332 women in England who had given birth within the past three months. Socioeconomic position was classified using the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) quintile and comprises distinct dimensions of deprivation, including; income, employment, health and disability.

Results showed that the most deprived women (quintile 5) were 60% less likely to have received any antenatal care, 38% less likely to have been seen by a health professional prior to 12 weeks gestation and 47% less likely to report being able to see a health professional as early as they desired in their pregnancy, when compared to the least deprived women (quintile 1).

Furthermore, the results show that with each increase in IMD quintile (corresponding to a decrease in socioeconomic position), women were shown to be 25% less likely to have any antenatal care, 15% more likely to  have had an unplanned than a planned caesarean section and 15% less likely to have had a routine postnatal check up. Additionally, they were 4% more likely to have had an antenatal hospital admission, 7% more likely to have been transferred during labour and 4% more likely to have had a caesarean birth.

Moreover, with decreasing socioeconomic position, women were generally more likely to report that they were not treated respectfully or spoken to in a way they could understand by doctors and midwives during their antenatal care and labour.

The study concludes that there is a need for a focusing of professionals and services towards pregnant women from lower socioeconomic groups and more targeted maternal public health education towards socially disadvantaged women.

Professor Marian Knight, from the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford and co-author of the study, said:

“There is a need for careful planning and development of strategies to address the possible reasons for these differences in healthcare delivery and outcomes.

“The findings from our analysis suggest that several factors may collectively contribute towards poorer maternal outcomes amongst women from the lowest socioeconomic groups. These include unplanned pregnancy, no antenatal care or late engagement with antenatal services, transfer during labour, higher caesarean section rates and poorer communication with healthcare professionals.”

John Thorp, BJOG Deputy Editor-in-chief said:

“This is a highly complex issue and resolving the root cause of such disparities on a national scale is not an easy task.

“The findings, however, do highlight a need for further initiatives to improve the continuity of maternity care and service provision with a greater focus on socially disadvantaged women, as well as better targeted maternal public health education.”

Ends

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Notes

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology is owned by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) but is editorially independent and published monthly by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal features original, peer-reviewed, high-quality medical research in all areas of obstetrics and gynaecology worldwide. Please quote ‘BJOG’ or ‘BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology’ when referring to the journal and include the website: www.bjog.org as a hidden link online.

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Please include a link to the paper in online coverage: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.13059 (please note this link will only be live once the embargo is lifted)

Also published on Wednesday 17 September 2014 in BJOG, an Australian study which examines the impact of socioeconomic position on maternal morbidity: The impact of socioeconomic position on severe maternal morbidity outcomes amongst women in Australia: a national case-control study. BJOG 2014; http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.13058

This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under the “Beyond maternal death: Improving the quality of maternity care through national studies of "near-miss" maternal morbidity” programme (Programme Grant RP-PG-0608-10038). The Department of Health in England funded the maternity survey. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website.

Reference


Anthea Lindquist, Jennifer J Kurinczuk, Maggie Redshaw, Marian Knight. Experiences, utilisation and outcomes of maternity care in England among women from different socioeconomic groups: Findings from the 2010 National Maternity Survey. BJOG 2014; http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.13059