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Postmenopausal bleeding – Poster

Published: 23/02/2021

This information is for you if you would like to know more about postmenopausal bleeding (PMB).

It may also be helpful if you are a partner, friend or relative of someone who is in this situation. 

Read or download versions of the poster below.

Thumbnail for patient information poster on Postmenoopausal Bleeding

 

 

Text version: Post-menopausal bleeding poster

What is PMB?

Any vaginal bleeding after the menopause is called PMB.

What causes PMB?

There are lots of causes for PMB such as menopause-related thinning of the lining of the vagina, polyps (growths from the lining of the uterus or cervix) and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

Less commonly, PMB can be a sign of cancer of the cervix, uterus or vagina.

1 in 10 women with PMB can have cancerous cells in the lining of their uterus.

What should I do if I have PMB?

You should arrange to see your GP urgently so that it can be quickly investigated.

What type of tests will I have?

You will be offered an internal examination and an ultrasound scan, usually done by inserting a small probe into your vagina. You may be offered a procedure called hysteroscopy, whereby a thin telescope is used to see inside your uterus. This can be done in the outpatient clinic or under general anaesthetic. A biopsy from the lining of your uterus may be done as an alternative to a hysteroscopy or at the same time.

Please see RCOG patient information on outpatient hysteroscopy: www.rcog.org.uk/outpatient-hysteroscopy

What are my treatment options?

You may not need any treatment. If treatment is advised, it will depend on the cause of the bleeding, and your healthcare professional will discuss this with you. 

9 in 10 women with PMB do not have cancer

If cancer is found it is usually at an early stage and treatment can cure it.

For more information, visit www.nhs.uk/conditions/post-menopausal-bleeding.

Sources and acknowledgments

This information has been developed by the RCOG Patient Information Committee. 

Before publication this information was reviewed by the public, by the RCOG Women’s Network and by the RCOG Women’s Voices Involvement Panel.

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Print version (PDF 170kb)

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